NY VOST Twitter Policy – Errant Post

Admit it, Correct it, Move on

All team members are expected be familiar with this policy prior to activation.

1. What is an Errant Post?
An “errant post” is a tweet that a volunteer accidentally Tweets from a team account, (e.g. @NYVOST) which was intended to come from their personal account. These may damage the reputation of the VOST if not caught quickly. Therefore, we have crafted the following “what to do if……..” as well as suggestions about how to avoid/mitigate this potential problem.

2. Mitigation – Suggestions on how to avoid this happening
We don’t dictate what tools/applications you use while working for the #VOST. Some of you use Tweetdeck, some HootSuite and others still use the simple Twitter interface. However, the following practices can be adopted in order to avoid accidentally posting from the wrong account:

  1. Dedicate a browser to Team activities: Use two different web browsers (e.g. chrome and safari). This way you can segregate your activities, literally. Chrome, for example, can be dedicated to personal or other active accounts you are managing, while Safari can be used for @NYVOST.
  2. Co-mingling Tweetdeck: Be careful when using Tweetdeck. That application, in particular, can be really “sticky.” For instance, if you add the @NYVOST account to your Tweetdeck and then Tweet for @NYVOST for several hours, it will use that account as a default.  You will need to “de-select” the account specifically when posting from other accounts, or it will post from both. Therefore, we do not recommend using Tweetdeck unless you are using it on another browser and the accounts are not co-mingled.
  3. Co-mingling Hootsuite: The free version of Hootsuite is not quite so problematic as Tweetdeck since it is only possible to have one person add the extra ID to their account at a time, but if you are the person tasked to add it, then be aware of similar issues. If you have a tab open that is not @NYVOST, but add the “Approved RT list” as a stream on another tab, or in your featured tab, then clicking RT may default to another account. Again, the ID must be manually selected/and other account(s) deselected.
  4. Use plain ole-Twitter. Twitter.com is the most straightforward for posting from one account, which is also one of its deficits. However, when Tweeting for another organization it is one of the safest bets to ensure you don’t use the wrong account.
  5. After you craft the tweet, always take a breath, and check which ID is ticked before clicking send.

3. What to do if and when this occurs
If you notice you have Tweeted from the wrong account, do the following:

  1. Immediately delete the Tweet.
  2. Tweet an apology from @NYVOST Twitter account:

Our apologies for the Tweet on Day _ Time (e.g.:  Sun 04 15:44). We have deleted the errant Tweet that was meant to be posted from a personal acct. ^yourmoniker (e.g. ^jl) #humanerror #incidenttag

  1. Make a copy of the errant tweet and post it to the Ops room, together with a copy of the Tweeted apology. Include a back link to the apology tweet.
  2. Record the activity in the team log.

4. If anyone RTs the post, it will be out there forever, however, we still recommend deleting it. Reply to the RTer from the VOST account with an @ message:

Our apologies for this Tweet. It was meant to be posted from a vols’ personal acct and does not reflect the views of the organization.

4. If you did not post the errant Tweet but notice it, then follow the same basic steps:

Our apologies for the Tweet on Day _ Time (e.g.:  Sun 04 15:44). We have deleted the errant Tweet that was meant to be posted from a personal acct.” ^yourmoniker (e.g. ^jl) #humanerror #incidenttag(s)

  1. Make a copy of the errant tweet and post it to the Ops room, together with a copy of the Tweeted apology. Include a backlink to the apology tweet for archive purposes.
  2. Record the activity in the team log

Whomever accidentally tweeted should have the opportunity to see their mistake and hopefully correct whatever caused the problem (e.g. sticky Tweetdeck).

Expect to feel mortified if this happens to you. Don’t beat yourself up. We’re human, not bots. The important thing is not that you made a mistake, it’s how you correct it.

Admit it, correct it, move on.


Written by: Kim Stephens and Joanna Lane for NY VOST: http://www.nyvost.vosg.us Originally published 11/5/2012 Revised 12/1/2012

Print PDF: NY VOST Twitter Policy

                   

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